Clubs: First test kicks off!

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A few weeks ago we posted an overview of a new initiative with Mozilla, “Webmaker Clubs.” While details (including the name!) are still pending, we’ve made great progress already on the program and are kicking off our first local tests this week.

Joined by over 40 organizations and individuals around the world, we’ll test the first section of our web literacy basics curriculum, based on our community-created Web Literacy Map.

We anticipate having a community-created and tested Web Literacy Basics curriculum ready by the end of March, consisting of three sections:

  • Reading the Web
  • Writing the Web
  • Participating on the Web

In addition, there will be extra guides and goodies packaged with the curriculum to help people start their own local clubs or to inject this kind of web literacy learning into their existing programs. These will be bolstered by an online “club house” and leadership development for club mentors.

If you’re interested in trying out the club curriculum or just learning more, drop us a line on this discussion thread.

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Testing 1. Reading the Web.

The first section consists of two 45min. activities, designed by the ever-pioneering MOUSE, to introduce learners to “Reading the Web.”

We selected these activities because we’re looking for lessons that:

  • are production-centered and about learning socially.
  • readily adapted to a local context.
  • work as standalone lessons or strung together for a larger arc.
  • require little or no prior web literacy skills for the mentor.
  • done offline, without internet or computers. or, at the very most, with only a modern browser.

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The testing process

Testers are looking at the effectiveness and compatibility of the activities. In particular, we’re interested in how people adapt the curriculum to their learners. One example could be swapping out the mythical creature, The Kraken, for your local variety, like Loch Ness, Knecht Ruprecht, etc.

We’d love to see greater remixes and alternatives to the activities themselves, hopefully uncovering more compelling and context-sensitive ways to teach credibility and web mechanics.

And most importantly, we’re looking at whether the activities meet our learning objectives. They should not only be fun and engaging, but instill real skill and a deeper understanding of the web.

The testing process invites our first cohort to:

  1. complete a pre-activity questionnaire
  2. do the activity first on their own
  3. do the activity with their learners
  4. complete a post-activity questionnaire
  5. share a reflection

where the questionnaires and reflection will unpack how the activities played out with learners and whether they taught what we think they do.

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Co-creating 2. Writing the Web

In parallel to testing the first section, we’re co-developing the second section with our fellow club creators. Here we hope to up-level two existing activities from the community and to prepare them for testing in the next round, starting Feb. 10.

If you have ideas for how to teach “Writing on the Web”, particularly the competencies of remix and composing, chime in!

There are some great activities identified so far, including the Gendered Advertising Remixer, Life in the Slowww Lane.

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Getting involved

There are also other groups emerging to hack on other aspects of clubs. These include:

  • online platform
  • leadership and professional development
  • localization

If you’re interested in any of the above topics, or would like to test and co-create the curriculum, please get in touch! We’d love to have your help to #teachtheweb.

Photos by Mozilla Europe available under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 license.

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